I thought I would be good. I thought all I needed was an audience and it would all come together. I’m such a  s t u p i d  f o o l .

thereal1990s:

My Girl (1991)

thereal1990s:

My Girl (1991)

wehadfacesthen:

With victory near, Marlene Dietrich crosses her fingers while visiting American soldiers on the front lines in Europe, 1945
via lapitiedangereuse

wehadfacesthen:

With victory near, Marlene Dietrich crosses her fingers while visiting American soldiers on the front lines in Europe, 1945

via lapitiedangereuse

daeneryus:

"i understand women have it bad but men have it bad too"

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"i mean, women are almost equal to men as it is"

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"i’m not a feminist, i believe in equality"

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I brought them here for myself. So people would come and they would see me and I would finally become a star. It’s what I’ve always wanted, nothing else. Is it too late for me? Is it wrong?


Lauren Bacall on the set of How to Marry a Millionaire, 1953

Lauren Bacall on the set of How to Marry a Millionaire, 1953

you make me really happy.

Once we settle in a booth, I bring up the astonishment that is Jasmine, the pretentious, self-deluded woman whose marriage to a Mado-type gure leaves her emotionally and - nancially wrecked. She’s a character who, as David Letterman put it, “[has you] by the throat for 90 minutes.” I tell her that I have written about more than a few Jasmines over the years. “We all know that person,” she says, “where there’s a ssure between the very thin mask and the person beneath it, and therein lies the person whom you could actually get to know.” Pause. “If they let you.” Another pause. “Or if they suered a breakdown and actually needed you.” She laughs. “But Jasmine isn’t to-the-manor-born. She’s utterly constructed. She’s invented the way she speaks, the way she moves. It’s all smoke and mirrors. People have been saying to me, ‘Oh, we don’t necessarily like her, but maybe we understand her. And I think there’s a veiled compliment there, which is wonderful. But I think, aren’t we all deluded? Surely we don’t all think that we are who we say we are?” I let out a startled laugh. - “Are we? I’m not!”

“My real life began with my marriage,” Grace said. “Sometimes, looking back after so many years, I think I really hated Hollywood without knowing it. I had lots of acquaintances there, and people I enjoyed working with and learned a lot from. But I found a great deal of fear among people in Hollywood—fear of not succeeding, and fear of succeeding but then losing the success. I’ve often said that it was a pitiless place, full of insecure people who had crippling problems. The unhappiness out there was like the smog—it covered everything. And I didn’t want to have to go along with all those illusions about youth when I was older. I had to be in my makeup chair at seven in the morning when I was twentysix. Rita Hayworth [who was thirty-seven] told me she had to be ready at six. I heard that Joan Crawford and Bette Davis [fifty and forty-seven, respectively] had to show up at five. What did that predict for me, if I stayed in the business any longer?” Grace Kelly (November 12, 1929 - September 14, 1982)